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Beware of the Lowest Bidder!

 

Low Roofing Bids: You Get What You Pay For

Roof repairs and replacements can be rather expensive. No one could blame you for trying to save a few bucks here and there. Obtaining multiple bids for roof work can be a helpful way to find the right roofing contractor for the best price. But what should your decision be based upon? We admit that the lowest roofing bid always looks attractive. But how low is too low? A roofing bid that’s low for the wrong reasons can wind up costing you a lot more in the long run if it fails prematurely. Here’s what to look out for when you are offered a low roofing bid.

 

Generic, Poor-Quality Roofing Materials

Watch out for roofing contractors who offer low bids by skimping on quality roofing materials. Using low-quality, generic roofing materials is a way to offer a low cost up front on a roof that will look fine until the shingles begin to fail shortly thereafter. Always ask who manufactured your roof shingles and how long the warranty lasts. Additionally, request that your roofing shingles be algae resistance, wind resistant, and impact resistant to avoid outside influences that could cause premature roof failure.

 

Shady Business Tactics

Roofing contractors can also save money by skimping on the costs it takes to run a safe and professional roofing business. They may not keep the proper insurance, leaving the liability on the homeowner. They may not have obtained proper licensing. They may not have the proper safety procedures in place. Always ask to see verification of license and insurance, and ask questions about their business practices. Also, be wary of a roofing contractor who does not have a physical address. This could be an indication of a fly-by-night contractor who could disappear at the first sign of a problem.

 

Handshake Agreements

Remember, nothing is final until it is in writing. A roofing contractor may offer a low bid up front, only to raise the price after the project has been started. Especially if you roof has already been torn off, this tactic leaves the homeowner with few options. Always make sure you have a detailed estimate of all labor and material costs in writing before work begins. A good rule of thumb is that you should always ask questions about roofing bids that are 15% more or less than the other roofing bids you obtain. A roofing contractor with a verified reputation using verified roofing materials will cause you far fewer problems in the long run. Ask your roofing contractor if he installs the full Manufacturer Roofing System. With a complete roofing system, you can be sure you will receive quality roofing materials that are designed to work together for optimum performance.

 

Call Urbach Roofing, Inc. for a Quality Roofing Estimate

760-471-5065

Urbach Roofing, Inc.

445 Production Street

San Marcos, CA 92078

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Tip of the Month

Poor Attic Ventilation Can Ruin Your Insulation, Destroy Your Shingles, and Raise Your Energy Bills!

Why Take Risks?

It is estimated that 9 out of 10 homes in North American do not have proper attic ventilation. Why? Because most people are unaware that attic ventilation can impact the longevity of their entire home!

For example, in the summer, an improperly ventilated attic can cause heat to build in excess of 160°F. This superheated air eventually penetrates the ceiling insulation into the living area below.

Types of damage that can result include:

  • Premature aging of your roofing system (“fried” shingles)
  • Warping, cracking, or breaking down of wood framing
  • Damage to siding, exterior or interior paint, and wallpaper
  • Higher energy costs

A properly ventilated attic can help reduce the load on your air conditioner by moving superheated air out of your attic before it builds up and causes damage.

In the winter, various household appliances, bathtubs, showers, and cooking vapors can contribute to excess moisture build-up. Improperly ventilated attics will allow this moisture to collect and cling to the underside of the roof. There, it will condense and fall, soaking the attic insulation and reducing its efficiency.

Additional structural damage can include:

  • Roof deck warping and rotting of the wood frame
  • Mildew growth
  • Buckling of shingles and felt

Proper Attic Ventilation
Proper attic ventilation systems allow a continuous flow of outside air through the attic (see illustration at left), protecting the efficiency of the insulation and helping to lower temperatures in the living space.

It consists of a balance between air intake (at your eaves or soffits) and air exhaust (at or near your roof ridge).

The FHA (Federal Housing Administration) recommends a minimum of at least 1 square foot of attic ventilation (both intake and exhaust) for every 300 square feet of attic space. For example, if your attic is 900 square feet, you need a total of 3 square feet of ventilation. This amount is generally divided equally between intake and exhaust ventilation (i.e., 1-1/2 feet of each), to ensure proper air flow through the attic. To calculate the amount of ventilation you need for your home, follow the example below.

 

Calculating Your Ventilation Requirements
Example: Calculating the number of lineal feet of Cobra® Exhaust Vent needed for a 30’x40’ attic:

Step 1

Calculate attic square footage
How: Multiply length of attic (in feet) times width of attic (in feet)
30’ x 40’ = 1,200 square feet

Intake ventilation MUST be at least equal to exhaust ventilation. To determine the number of intake vents needed, select your vent and install enough vents so that their combined NFA is at least 288 square inches.

Remember:
Always have a balanced ventilation system. In no case should the amount of exhaust ventilation exceed the amount of intake ventilation.

Step 2

Calculate NFA (Net Free Area) needed for this attic by using the “1 in 300” rule
How: Divide attic square footage by 300
1,200 sq. ft. ÷ 300 = 4 square feet of NFA needed

Step 3
Convert square feet of NFA to square inches
How: Multiply square feet of NFA by 144
4 sq. ft. x 144 
Step 4
Split the amount of NFA needed equally between the intake and the exhaust
How: Divide square inches of NFA needed by 2
576 sq. in. ÷ 2 = 288 square inches of NFA needed equally for exhaust & intake
Step 5
Calculate # of lineal feet of Cobra Exhaust Vent needed
How: Divide the square inches of NFA needed at the ridge by the NFA of the Cobra® Exhaust Vent (Cobra® Exhaust Vent has 16.9 sq. inches of NFA per lineal foot)
288 sq. in. ÷ 16.9 = 17 lineal feet
This attic required seventeen (17) lineal feet of Cobra® Exhaust Vent to meet FHA minimum requirements.